Oceania

New Zealand

What is New Zealand like?

Friendly and welcoming people

Kiwis are incredibly friendly people, with a laidback and positive attitude towards life. Compared to European countries, New Zealand is still a young country. Even Māori, the country’s native inhabitants, have only been living on the island for about 800 years. New Zealand is almost entirely composed of immigrants, their society is open-minded and welcoming of other nationalities and cultures.

Amazing weather all year

New Zealand benefits from a temperate and mild climate all year, meaning that there are more days of sunshine than rain. During the winter months, the North Island stays warm and sunny while the South Island can be covered in snow. Nature lovers will enjoy the endless outdoor activities the country has to offer, regardless of the season. Skiing down a mountain in the morning and surfing in the afternoon is definitely possible in New Zealand.

Untouched nature

Have you ever watched “Lord of the Rings” and “The Hobbit” and admired the natural scenery? Did you know the movies were shot in New Zealand? There are still so many untouched and rugged places, even just a few kilometers outside of big cities. You will feel like an explorer setting foot there for the first time. For a small country, New Zealand has one of the most diverse landscapes in the world. You will find untouched beaches, rainforests, deserts, fjords, glaciers, and mountains.

Safe for everyone

New Zealand places 14 as one of the safest countries. The crime rate in New Zealand is extremely low compared to elsewhere in the world. New Zealand even ranked second in both the 2019 Global Peace Index and in the 2018 Corruption Perceptions Index. Political scandals are minor compared to other countries.

Why study in New Zealand?

Globally recognised qualifications

All eight universities of New Zealand consistently rank high in QS World Rankings and Times Higher Education Rankings, and qualifications from any of these are accredited across the globe, opening doors to prospects everywhere. The New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) also ensures that institutions are registered to enrol international students and comply with qualifications standards.

Excellent pedagogy

Influenced by the UK education system, New Zealand focuses on research-based teaching, which means you will learn dealing with situations in a systematic and an organised manner. You’ll be taught how to work independently as well as in a team at various levels. Studying here will encourage you to think critically, question and benefit from student-teacher interaction. You’ll also be implementing the concepts learnt in the classroom and develop different approaches towards solving a problem.

Innovation and research

New Zealand provides abundant opportunities in research for students. The country boasts of highly experienced faculty, well-equipped laboratories, access to latest technology, equipment, and opportunities. Its innovative spirit has made it a hub of new technologies, research and development in various fields such as healthcare, physics, geology, engineering, astronomy, computer science, agriculture, etc. Add to it, the Nobel prizes that the country has in its kitty simply reinstate the significance and vast scope of research in New Zealand.

Quality of life

New Zealand offers a wonderful multi-cultural environment that exists in perfect harmony with the country’s outdoorsy lifestyle. Replete with all kinds of natural landscapes ranging from snowcapped mountains and steaming volcanoes to rolling green hills, golden sandy beaches and lush rainforests, New Zealand screams wanderlust. Living here provides every student a chance to grow with its diverse culture and natural beauty all at once.

You can work to support your studies

As an international student in New Zealand, you can work for up to 20 hours every week during your semesters and full-time during breaks. In fact, if you’re pursuing research masters or a doctoral degree, you will be allowed to work full-time.

The education system

Tertiary education (Ages 18+)

New Zealand has eight state-funded universities, 16 Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs) which have been unified into the New Zealand Institute of Skills and Technology (NZIST), and about 550 Private Training Establishments (PTEs), which include English language schools.

Choose the type of institution that’s best for your career path:

  • Universities offer higher degree-level education. Programs are research-led and generally academic rather than vocational. In the 2020 QS World University Rankings, seven of New Zealand’s universities were in the top 100 in at least one subject.
  • ITPs and a few larger PTEs offer vocational degree-level education.
  • PTEs tend to offer specific vocational programs, mainly at certificate and diploma level.

Secondary school (Ages 13-18)

New Zealand has three types of school:

  • state schools, where 85% of Kiwi children go
  • state-integrated schools, which may be run by a religious faith or use specialist teaching methods
  • private schools.

Students at secondary schools - also known as high schools or colleges - work towards the National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA). Secondary schools also offer some vocational subjects, such as tourism and computing.

Some schools also offer Cambridge International Examinations and International Baccalaureate programs.

How NCEA works: www.nzqa.govt.nz/qualifications-standards/qualifications/ncea/understanding-ncea/how-ncea-works/

Intermediate school (Ages 11-12)

Intermediate schools are a bridge between primary school and secondary school.

Primary education starts at Year 1 and continues through to Year 8. Years 7 and 8 are offered either at a primary school or at a separate intermediate school.

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